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North of Old River

Three Rivers Wildlife Management Area

Three Rivers Wildlife Management Area

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Three River Wildlife Management Area

Cocodrie Parish, Louisiana

Tucked between the Red River and the Mississippi and north of Lower Old River is the Three Rivers Wildlife Management Area. Only a levee separates it from the Red River Wildlife Management Area, and the river separates it from the Grassy Lake Wildlife Management Area to the west. It is the southern-most refuge in a very swampy region.

The refuge protects 27,380 acres forested in bottomland hardwoods. What grows where depends on where in the ridge and swale landscape it takes root.  Where the soil is low and wet, cypress, Nuttal oak, Overcup oak, bitter pecan, and honey locust form the overstory; swamp-privet, buttonbush, and hawthorn form the understory. On the natural levees and other ridges where it is higher and dryer, hackberry, ash, sweet pecan, box elder, sycamore, and Nuttal oak dominate the overstory; dewberry, poison ivy, swamp dogwood, rattan, and green-brier dominate the understory. Cottonwood and willow, growing in pure stands, anchor a large, engineered sand ridge.

Hunters come to Three Rivers for the deer, turkey, squirrels, and waterfowl. Trappers come for raccoon, mink, nutria, beaver, bobcat, fox, otter, and coyote. Anglers come for bass, bluegill, carp, drum, gar bowfin, and catfish.

The Louisiana Black Bear and the Bald Eagle are the endangered species that find refuge in the Three Rivers WMA.


   

     Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, “Three Rivers Wildlife Management Area,’ Back Yard Nature, “Wildflowers and Ferns in the Loess Hills,” http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/wmas/wmas/list.cfm?wmaid=51.

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