• The Mississippi: A Visual Biography by Quinta Scott

    "Great book and great blog - thanks for the first book I have seen that addresses the contemporary river, headwaters to gulf." Dan McGuiness, Audubon, St. Paul, Minnesota

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Infrastructure–The Stimulus Bill

 

Upper Mississippi: Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge, Trempealeau County, Wisconsin

Upper Mississippi: Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge, Trempealeau County, Wisconsin

The Corps will receive $4.6 billion nationwide, including $2 billion for waterways construction of which $500 million will go to repair locks and dams and $200 million for dam safety.

Only projects that have received previous funding are eligible for stimulus funds. The Corps lay out priorities and accelerate existing contracts or fund projects that can be completed within two years and chose projects that are labor intensive.

The Corps will carry out aquatic ecosystem restoration in collaboration with the states. The Corps will carry out fish and wildlife habitat restoration under Section 1135 of the 1986 Water Resources Development Act at existing Corps’ projects, places that have been degraded by those projects. Much of the habitat restoration that has been done on the Upper Mississippi since 1986 has been under this section. The stimulus will also fund  small flood damage reduction projects, and steambank restoration, both structural–levees and floodwalls, and non-structural–the relocation of structures and  floodproofing.

In the same vein the Mississippi River and Tributaries project, an ongoing project since 1927, will receive $250,000,000 for previously funded projects that can be completed in two years and can start within 45 days of passage of the stimulus bill.

The Corps will receive $2,225,000,000 for operations and maintenance of projects that can be accelerated, fully funded within two years.

Sen. Mary Landrieu announced that the  stimulus bill will provide $460 million to the Corps of Engineers for projects in Louisiana.

The Corps funds are expected to create as many as 37,000 direct new private sector jobs and as many as 102,000 indirect jobs for related industries.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will receive $300,000,000 for road and bridge repair and replacement, deferred maintenance, improvement projects on National Wildlife Refuges, National Fish Hatcheries, and other properties owned by the Service. 

Sabine National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron Parish, Louisiana has been closed since 2005 when Hurricane Rita washed through the Refuge

Salt Marsh, Sabine National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron Parish, Louisiana has been closed since 2005 when Hurricane Rita washed through the Refuge

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will receive $400,000,000 for habitat restoration and mitigation activities, and $600,000,000 for accelerating satellite development and acquisition, acquiring climate sensors and climate modeling capacity, and establishing climate data records with not less than $140,000,000 going to climate data modeling.

Sadly, there is no money in the stimulus bill for the National Ecosystem Sustainability Program on the Upper Mississippi River, authorized in the 2007 Water Resources Development Act, but never funded, possibly because it never has been funded. Most of the money for Corps projects in the stimulus bill seems to go for ongoing projects, rather than new projects.

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2 Responses

  1. The soft glow on that salt marsh shot is really nice.

    Chris

    • Thanks. Early morning is a lovely time to make photographs. So is evening light. Winter light, too.

      Please spread the word.

      Quinta Scott

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